Skip to main content
Go to accessibility notice
There are currently no items available for purchase in this Department. Search our Auction Archives below to find item values.

Steve McCurry (American, b.1950)

Photography

Biography:
Steve McCurry (April 23, 1950) is an American photographer and photojournalist. Known for braving war-torn areas and for his striking, evocative portraits of the people who live there, McCurry’s work has been recognized with multiple awards over the course of an impressive career. He’s won the Magazine Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographers Association, the Royal Photographic Society’s Centenary Medal, and has had multiple first-place wins in the World Press Photo Contest.

McCurry attended Penn State, graduating in 1974 before working at a small town newspaper in Pennsylvania for two years. He left in 1978 to begin his journey as a freelance photojournalist in India. This would mark the start of a career that would span six continents and record innumerable iconic moments that have defined conflict photojournalism for the 20th century.

The first warzone McCurry photographed was in Afghanistan. After smuggling himself across the Pakistani border, McCurry took now-iconic photos of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. He smuggled rolls of film by sewing them into his clothing. These images, full of intense colors and imagery, would be published by The New York Times, Time, and Paris Match. That year, 1980, he won the Robert Capa Gold Medal for Best Photographic Reporting from Abroad.

December of 1984 would bring us the defining image of Steve McCurry, Afghan Girl. McCurry traveled to a refugee camp in Pakistan where he met Sharbat Gula in a one-room school for girls. "I noticed this one little girl with these incredible eyes, and I instantly knew that this was really the only picture I wanted to take," McCurry said in an interview. It was the first time the girl had ever been photographed.

This striking image is now an indelible part of our collective history. Used on the cover of National Geographic for the June 1985 issue, Afghan Girl has also been used on Amnesty International brochures and posters, humanizing the cost of conflict in a way that is both beautiful and haunting. This image has been called “the most recognized photograph” in the history of National Geographic.

It is through Afghan Girl that we can see the lens with which McCurry views the world, subjects as people rather than as political movements. It is why McCurry’s work transcends traditional photojournalistic work to become art.

“Most of my images are grounded in people,” says McCurry. “I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey what it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape, that you could call the human condition.”

Read More


Filters (4)
Save "Steve McCurry" to My Wantlist Free Appraisal

How do you know what's valuable?

Our Art Value Guide provides free information about how to value your Steve McCurry Artwork.

Get Notified of New Matches Create a Wantlist for "Steve McCurry"
Create Wantlist
Have Steve McCurry Artwork to sell? Ask about cash advances.
Free Appraisal

Steve McCurry Original Art values sold at auction

* Although your bid is currently losing, your Bid Protection on this lot is still in effect, and it will be placed during the live auction. You can view/edit your Bid Protection in Heritage Live during the auction event.

GREEN indicates a winning bid. Highlighted GREEN indicates that the current bid is within one increment of your secret maximum. RED indicates a losing bid.
GREEN indicates your reserve is met. Highlighted GREEN indicates that the current bid is within one increment of your secret maximum. RED indicates your reserve is not met.
GREEN indicates a winning bid or that your reserve is met. Highlighted GREEN indicates that the current bid is within one increment of your secret maximum. RED indicates a losing bid or that your reserve is not met.
1
Results per page: 24 48 72